Outdoor World

How Spanish flu helped create Sweden’s modern welfare state

The 1918 pandemic ravaged the remote city of stersund. But its legacy is a city and country well-equipped to deal with 21 st century challenges On 15 September 1918, a 12 -year-old boy named Karl Karlsson who lived just outside Ostersund, Sweden, wrote a short diary entry:” Two who died of Spanish influenza buried today. A few snowflakes in the air .” For all its brevity and matter-of-fact tone, Karlsson’s journal makes grim reading. It is 100 years since a particularly virulent strain of avian flu, known as the Spanish…

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Outdoor World

‘It belongs to all of Sarajevo’: reopened cable car lifts city out of the past

The siege of Sarajevo turned vacation place Mount Trebevi into a deadly sniper post. Can the reopening of its famous gondola journey ultimately heal old wounds? P azite, Snajper !– Beware, Sniper!- alerted the signs along the Sarajevo street exposed to marksmen looking through their rifle viewfinders from the top of Mount Trebevic. People would sprint from one side of “sniper’s alley” to the other to deliver supplies to family and friends- demise hot on their heels. The hillside where tens of thousands are applied to expend their Saturdays before…

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Outdoor World

‘It belongs to all of Sarajevo’: reopened cable car lifts city out of the past

The siege of Sarajevo turned leisure place Mount Trebevi into a deadly sniper posture. Can the reopening of its famous gondola ride eventually heal old meanders? P azite, Snajper !– Beware, Sniper!- warned the signs along the Sarajevo street exposed to marksmen looking through their rifle viewfinders from the highest level of Mount Trebevic. People would sprint from one side of “sniper’s alley” to the other to deliver supplies to family and friends- death hot on their heels. The hillside where tens of thousands used to expend their Saturdays before…

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Outdoor World

Hipster-bashing in California: angry residents fight back against gentrification

In a country where house costs are twice the US average, artists and developers are feeling the ire of a developing motion to defend our homes and our culture Half a century after the summer of love and hippie harmony, California is experiencing a summertime of loathing and hipster-bashing. Not simply hipsters. Artists, techies, realtors, business owners, developers, everyone is seeming the rage of a burgeoning and in some cases radicalising anti-gentrification movement. In the Los Angeles community of Boyle Heights, objectors are targeting a new coffeehouse with placards, chants…

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Outdoor World

Pedal-ins and car burials: what happened to America’s forgotten 1970s cycle boom?

Bicycle madness once recognized US bike auctions outstrip gondolas, and spawned ambitious a blueprint for 100,000 miles of cycle directions. Then the music stopped The bicycles biggest billow of notoriety in its 154 -year history, spurted Time magazine in 1970 at the start of Americas five-year love affair with the bicycle. Some 64 million fellow travellers are taking regularly to bikes these days, more than ever before, research reports persisted, and more than ever[ they are] remain convinced that two pedals are better than four. US bicycle auctions, which had…

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