Outdoor World

Snorkelling grandmothers uncover large population of venomous sea snakes in Noumea

Womens photography of greater sea snake, once believed to be an anomaly in the Baie des Citrons, help scientists understand the ecosystem A group of snorkelling grandmothers who swim up to 3km five days a week have uncovered a large population of venomous sea snakes in a bay in Noumea where scientists once believed they were rare. Dr Claire Goiran from the University of New Caledonia and Professor Rick Shine from Australias Macquarie University were studying a small harmless species known as the turtleheaded sea snake located in the Baie…

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Outdoor World

‘Amazing but also concerning’: weird wildlife ventures to northern Alaska

Arctic Dispatches , portion 2: As the Arctic heats up, residents of Utqiavik are experiencing first linked with unusual species that are making their behavior polewards Last July, Nagruk Harcharek was savouring a bucolic visit to a cabin that sits on the lip of the Chipp river, deep in the Alaskan Arctic, when something caught his eye. Shimmering on a rack where he hangs his caught whitefish to dry was, astonishingly, a dragonfly. ” I’d been going to camp there for 30 years and I’d never seen one, I couldn’t…

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Outdoor World

One of world’s largest marine parks created off coast of Easter Island

Rapa Nui protection area, about same sizing as Chilean mainland, will safeguard up to 142 species, including 27 threatened with extinction One of the world’s largest marine protection areas has been created off the coast of Easter Island. The 740,000 sq km discovered several new species previously unknown to science. Apex predators found in the conservation zone include scalloped hammerhead sharks, minke, humpback and blue whales, and four species of ocean turtle. Matt Rand, the manager of the Pew Bertarelli ocean legacy programme, which campaigned for the park, said:” This…

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Outdoor World

Sea Sheep? This Adorable Sea Slug Eats So Much Algae It Can Photosynthesize

What’s fascinating about the tiny’ leaf sheep, ’ which can grow up to 5mm in duration and can be found near Japan, Indonesia and the Philippines, is that they are one of the only animals in the world that they were able perform photosynthesis( the others all belong to the sacoglossa ocean slug clade ). When they eat algae, they suck out the chloroplasts and incorporate them into their own bodies in a process called kleptoplasty. This process, which otherwise can only be performed by single-celled creatures, basically makes them…

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